Addressing Disruptive and Noncompliant Behaviors

Addressing Disruptive and Noncompliant Behaviors (Part 1):

Understanding the Acting-Out Cycle

Assessment

Take some time now to answer the following questions. Please note that the IRIS Center does not collect your Assessment responses. If this is a course assignment, you should turn them in to your professor using whatever method he or she requires. If you have trouble answering any of the questions, go back and review the Perspectives & Resources pages in this module.

  1. List three reasons why some students continue to cause problems even when there is a good classroom management plan in place?
  2. Discuss at least one benefit and one challenge of intervening early in the acting-out cycle to prevent problem behaviors from escalating.
  3. Think back to the Challenge at the beginning of this module. Ms. Rollison is having trouble with Patrick, who is a model student on some days and is rude and disruptive and refuses to work. Unfortunately, she probably does not have enough information to figure out what Patrick’s triggers are. Although not discussed explicitly in the module, can you think of three methods by which Ms. Rollison could determine his triggers?
  4. tameka refusing workMs. Rollison is also having trouble with Tameka, who refuses to do any written work. In this case, Ms. Rollison does have enough information to figure out what Tameka’s trigger is. What is it?

5.miss rollison worrying Once either Patrick or Tameka enters the Agitation Phase, what would you recommend that Ms. Rollison do? If she doesn’t recognize the Agitation Phase, what would you recommend differently for the Acceleration Phase?

  1. What is the primary reason that teachers are often reluctant to engage in debriefing during the Recovery Phase? Why is it important to debrief in spite of this reluctance?

Addressing Disruptive and Noncompliant Behaviors (Part 2):Behavioral Interventions

Assessment

Take some time now to answer the following questions. Please note that the IRIS Center does not collect your Assessment responses. If this is a course assignment, you should turn them in to your professor using whatever method he or she requires. If you have trouble answering any of the questions, go back and review the Perspectives & Resources pages in this module.

  1. meeting at tableWhy is a special education teacher a good resource to help deal with student behavior problems?
  2. Explain how high-p requests work and why they increase the probability that a student will comply with a teacher’s request.
  3. Imagine that you have a student in your class who acts out during independent math activities. Would you use high-p requests or choice making with this student? Explain your answer.
  4. For what types of behaviors would you implement a DRL procedure? Give one example.
  5. List a consideration for teachers who implement DRI.
  6. Mary Jo often spends time talking to her table group about topics not related to the instructional task. Design a DRO procedure to decrease non-instructional talk and to increase instructional talk.

Week 3

Classroom Behavior Management (Part 1):Key Concepts and Foundational Practices

Assessment

Take some time now to respond to the items below. Please note that the IRIS Center does not collect your Assessment responses. If this is a course assignment, you should turn them in to your professor using whatever method he or she requires. If you have difficulty responding, go back and review the Perspectives & Resources pages in this module.

  1. Briefly describe three of the benefits of implementing comprehensive classroom behavior management.
  2. Using your own words, explain the meaning of “cultural gaps” and describe two culturally sustaining practices teachers can use to address them.
  3. Identify three of the six key principles of classroom behavior management outlined in the module and offer specific example of how a teacher might use each of them in the classroom.
  4. Ms. Rollison wishes to develop a positive climate in her classroom.

a. List two of the practices listed in the module.

b. Explain two action steps that Ms. Rollison can take to implement these practices.

  1. Mr. Kwon is a new teacher setting up a structured classroom for 25 4th-grade students. Though he is excited to use lots of hands-on activities and types of instruction across content areas, he is uncertain how to structure his classroom to keep his students on task, engaged, and learning throughout the school day.

a. Offer two considerations that Mr. Kwon should keep in mind when arranging the physical elements of his classroom.

b. Explain why each of these is important.

  1. Mr. Kwon also wants to set up a routine for a daily morning meeting to encourage interaction and engagement before the students start their academic work. Describe at least two tips to help Mr. Kwon successfully implement this classroom routine.
  2. Sierra, a student in Ms. Gardner’s 8th-grade science class, is usually shy and anxious. When she works with a partner at a lab station, however, she often becomes very talkative. This disruptive behavior regularly causes her and her partner to miss important teacher directions and not complete labs on time.

a. Name at least two surface management strategies that Ms. Gardner could use to address Sierra’s disruptive behavior.

b. Explain why you chose each of these strategies.

Classroom Behavior Management (Part 2, Elementary):Developing a Behavior Management Plan

Assessment

Take some time now to respond to the items below. Please note that the IRIS Center does not collect your Assessment responses. If this is a course assignment, you should turn them in to your professor using whatever method he or she requires. If you have difficulty responding, go back and review the Perspectives & Resources pages in this module.

  1. At the beginning of the school year, you created a classroom behavior management plan, and for the most part it has been working well. Lately, however, you’ve noticed a number of students eating candy and chewing gum during class. List two changes that you could make to your behavior plan to address this increasingly problematic behavior.
  2. Most teachers create procedures for routine activities (e.g., walking in the hallway, going to the restroom). Just as important are procedures for less-frequent activities (e.g., attending an assembly, responding to a fire or tornado drill). Select a less-frequent activity and write out a new procedure to address it.
  3. You developed a step-by-step crisis behavior plan to address serious problem behaviors that might arise in the classroom. Now consider what you would do if a behavior crisis occurred while your students were a) in an assembly or b) on the playground. Create a separate crisis plan to address one of these situations.
  4. You created an action plan to effectively implement your behavior management plan. Midway through the school year, though, two new students are assigned to your class.

a. How would you introduce these students to your classroom behavior management plan?

b. How would you introduce their parents to the classroom behavior management plan?

  1. To complete the following activity, you will need to revisit (though not change) your classroom behavior management plan. Imagine you are teaching a 50-minute class and your students engage in the behaviors listed in the table below during that one period. Note: We recommend that you read through all of the behaviors once before beginning the activity.

a. In the table below, indicate how you would address each of these behaviors. First check whether you would deliver a positive or negative consequence. Then write down the consequence you would deliver.

b. Let’s assume that you have implemented a comprehensive behavior management plan and these behavioral issues continued to occur. Which parts of your plan should you consider revising?

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